Ross Kaminsky writes on Tuesday’s stunning rebuke of President Obama’s latest exercise in incessant hyper-partisan rhetoric challenging the independence of the federal judiciary by Judge Jerry Smith of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. It’s a must-read not only because it provides an excellent perspective on our president’s character (rather the lack of it) and his propensity to not only offer his opinion when it is improper, unneeded and unhelpful, but arrogantly make highly objectionable statements that expose him to unnecessary political risk, as well:

[...] The President has made a habit of offering his opinion where it is not only unneeded but also exposes the president to unnecessary political risk.

ought that Obama, our nation’s first or second black president, depending on how you categorize Bill Clinton, would have learned his lesson about jumping into racially-charged kerfuffles after calling Cambridge, Massachusetts police “stupid” for arresting (black) Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates.

But that didn’t stop him from commenting on the Trayvon Martin situation, saying “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon” and calling for some national “soul-searching,” again without having any facts beyond what the rest of the nation had read in the newspaper.

On the other hand,

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  • Description: Ross Kaminsky writes on Tuesday’s stunning rebuke of President Obama’s latest exercise in incessant hyper-partisan rhetoric challenging the independence of the federal judiciary by Judge Jerry Smith of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. It’s a must-read not only because it provides an excellent perspective on our president’s character (rather the lack of it) and his propensity to not only offer his opinion when it is improper, unneeded and unhelpful,